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Systems Dynamics & Supply Chain Management" Headings!

Posted on: Sunday, August 12, 2018 9:00:00 AM CDT

Class,

Please follow the following outline and use the recommended "Topic Headings" to ensure you cover all requirements.

Activity Instruction
Throughout the course, you will examine foundational concepts and best practices in supply chain management and implications of globalization on the scope and scale of internal business processes. You will analyze supply chain management using the principles of systems theory. For your course project, you will have an opportunity to apply systems theory to foundational concepts and best practices, using a real-world case study presented in your Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Managementtextbook. You will analyze the Japanese auto supply chain, creating holistic, interactive, and transdisciplinary system maps that identify the entire supply chain.

Your Final Course Project should include the following elements, please use these "Numbered Bullets" as Headings on your assignment:

This assignment is the final component of your course project. For this assignment:

  1. Integrate and revise the systems maps from your individual assignments to create a holistic, interactive, and transdisciplinary system map of the current state of the Japanese auto supply chain.
  2. Integrate the analyses from your previous assignments to create a cohesive explanation of your overall analysis and defense of your systems map,
  3. Provide a conclusions, and Future Model View for the supply chain.

Refer to the Systems Dynamics and Supply Chain Management course project description to ensure you meet all of the evaluation criteria and assignment requirements. Be sure to incorporate the instructor feedback you received throughout the course and review your paper for errors prior to submission.

Project Requirements

To achieve a successful project experience and outcome, you are expected to meet the following requirements.

  • Written communication:Written communication is free of errors that detract from the overall message.
  • APA formatting:Resources and citations are formatted according to APA (6th edition) style and formatting.
  • Number of resourcesMinimum of six resources.
  • Length of paper:Five typed double-spaced pages.
  • Font and font size:10-point Arial.

 

CASE STUDY Supply-Chain Challenges in Post-Earthquake Japan

Japanese automakers have long been known for the quality of their products, and especially for the efficiency of their streamlined manufacturing and supply processes. Thus, few people could have predicted how severely the destructive earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011 would disrupt the country’s entire auto industry. Matters were further complicated by the damage the quake and floodwaters caused to one of Japan’s nuclear power plants, interrupting power supplies around the country and creating a dangerous radiation zone for miles around the plant.

Following the quake and ensuing floods, most automotive factories in Japan were closed for at least several weeks, bringing to a halt about 13% of worldwide auto production. Toyota, Honda, and Mazda shut down many of their parts and manufacturing plants in Japan, and Toyota also announced plans to suspend production in at least one North American plant because of parts shortages. The company said it would make plant improvements and run training programs in its other U.S. facilities while the assembly lines were idle or run operations on a part-time basis to conserve its parts inventory. Honda, Nissan, and Subaru also reduced their North American output as they anticipated and tried to deal with expected parts shortages.

Since one of the guiding principles of Lean production is to keep parts inventories as low as possible, it wasn’t long before these shortages occurred. “The supply chain in the automotive industry is so fragile,” said one legal advisor to the global auto industry. “It’s based on just-in-time principles, where you don’t have a lot of inventories built up, so you leave yourself without much margin for error when a supply interruption happens.”

Industry observers predicted that about half of Japan’s auto capacity would remain closed for at least eight weeks after the disaster, which would eventually put about one-third of worldwide production in jeopardy, as the effects of parts shortages made themselves increasingly felt in manufacturing facilities far from Japan. One auto industry research firm predicted that about five million cars that the industry had expected to sell in 2011 would never be made.

By spring and summer 2011, in fact, U.S. auto dealers were reporting what one called “a lot of emptiness” in their showrooms. Many logged dwindling sales as supplies fell to as little as one-fifth their normal levels, and popular cars such as the Honda Civic and Accord went out of stock. Without new cars to sell, even trade-in sales were slowing. Honda posted a 27% decline in sales for August 2011, and Toyota anticipated a dramatic 31% profit decline for the year. Although the Japanese auto industry worked hard to quickly return to full capacity, output was still not fully restored some six months after the disaster. The disaster’s long-lasting ripple effects thus motivated industry executives to consider some changes in their vaunted manufacturing and supply operations. Traditionally, Toyota had used a single source for many parts that were common to more than one of its car models. Although the company locally sources about 85% to 90% of parts and materials needed for its North American manufacturing operations, a strategy that should make it less vulnerable to supply interruptions in Japan, it actually builds a larger proportion of its vehicles in Japan than do the other automakers, so the 2011 disaster was a serious blow.

In response to these problems, Toyota’s management began work to “foolproof” the supply chain so that it could recover from major interruptions in as little as two weeks. The plan had three parts. First, Toyota would increase standardization of auto parts so all Japanese carmakers could share the supply. These parts would be made in several locations to ensure uninterrupted supply. Next, the company asked its upstream suppliers of highly specialized parts, or parts that are sourced from only one location, to hold larger inventories than they had been carrying, as and opened up new options for manufacturing such parts to reduce its dependence on single sources. Finally, and perhaps most ambitiously, Toyota took steps to make each of its global regions independent of the others in terms of parts supply, so supply chain disruptions in one area will not spill over into the operations of any other areas.

(Bozarth 421)

Bozarth, Cecil C. Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management, 4th Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions, 2014-12-01. VitalBook file.

The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

(Bozarth 420-421)

Bozarth, Cecil C. Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management, 4th Edition. Pearson Learning Solutions, 2014-12-01. VitalBook file.

The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.

Systems Dynamics and Supply Chain Management Scoring Guide

Due Date: End of Unit 6. 
Percentage of Course Grade: 25%.

Note: Your instructor may also use the Writing Feedback Tool to provide feedback on your writing. In the tool, click on the linked resources for helpful writing information.

CRITERIA

NON-PERFORMANCE

BASIC

PROFICIENT

DISTINGUISHED

Apply a systems thinking approach to global operations and supply chain management.
20%

Does not apply a systems thinking approach or unclearly and inadequately applies a systems thinking approach to global operations and supply chain management.

Applies a systems thinking approach to global operations and supply chain management with frequent inaccuracies. May demonstrate a major misconception of the systems thinking approach.

Applies a systems thinking approach to global operations and supply chain management. Demonstrates understanding of systems thinking approach frequently in analysis and mapping of global operations and supply chain management.

Applies a systems thinking approach to global operations and supply chain management. Demonstrates a thorough understanding of systems thinking and integrates approach throughout analysis and mapping of global operations and supply chain management. Uses systems thinking clearly, accurately, precisely, and insightfully.

Coordinate internal and external tasks across global operations and the supply chain.
20%

Does not illustrate, or inadequately illustrates, internal and external tasks across global operations and the supply chain.

Illustrates internal and external tasks across global operations and the supply chain but does not propose solutions to improve the coordination of tasks across global operations and the supply chain.

Coordinates internal and external tasks across global operations and the supply chain. Illustrates internal and external tasks across global operations and the supply chain accurately and proposes solutions to improve the coordination of tasks across global operations and the supply chain.

Evaluates and coordinates internal and external tasks across global operations and the supply chain. Assesses current practice in coordinating internal and external tasks across global operations and the supply chain and proposes best practices to improve coordination of tasks across global operations and the supply chain.

Integrate quality assurance practices across global operations and the supply chain.
20%

Does not analyze quality assurance practices across global operations and the supply chain. Does not illustrate, or unclearly and inadequately illustrates, components of quality assurance.

Analyzes quality assurance practices across global operations and the supply chain. Illustrates some components of quality assurance. May demonstrate a major misconception of ethics as quality assurance within global operations and the supply chain.

Integrates quality assurance practices across global operations and the supply chain. Illustrates integration of quality assurance and demonstrates understanding of ethics as quality assurance across global operations and the supply chain.

Integrates quality assurance practices across global operations and the supply chain. Demonstrates a thorough understanding of ethics as quality assurance and integrates understanding throughout analysis and mapping of global operations and supply chain management.

Apply the use of information infrastructures to the management and the coordination of global operations and supply chain management.
20%

Does not illustrate, or inadequately illustrates, the use of information infrastructures in global operations and supply chain management.

Illustrates the use of information infrastructures in global operations and supply chain management but does not propose solutions to improve management and coordination using information infrastructures.

Applies the use of information infrastructures to the management and the coordination of global operations and supply chain management. Illustrates the use of information infrastructures in global operations and supply chain management and proposes solutions to improve management and coordination using information infrastructures.

Applies the use of information infrastructures to the management and coordination of global operations and supply chain management. Assesses current use of information infrastructures across global operations and the supply chain and proposes best practices to improve management and coordination using information infrastructures.

Create a holistic, interactive, and transdisciplinary systems map of a global operations and supply management chain.
20%

Does not create a systems map of a global operations and supply management chain or creates a systems map of a global operations and supply management chain that is none of the following characteristics: holistic, interactive, and transdisciplinary.

Creates a systems map of a global operations and supply management chain but may not be all of the following characteristics: holistic, interactive, and transdisciplinary.

Creates a holistic, interactive, and transdisciplinary systems map of a global operations and supply management chain. Illustrates the scope and the scale of a complete global operations and supply management chain. Demonstrates understanding of the nonlinear nature of a global operations and supply management chain. Integrates the perspectives of global operations, supply chain, quality, and knowledge management.

Creates a holistic, interactive, and transdisciplinary systems map of a global operations and supply management chain. Clearly, accurately, and precisely illustrates global operations and supply management chain in systems map.

 

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Tags: Systems Dynamics, Supply Chain Management, Chain Management, Assignments, CASE STUDY

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